Urban Studies | Trinity University
Apply Now Visit Trinity

Urban studies at Trinity is designed to expose students to urban history, urban society, and urban development while encouraging contributions to social change—all in the vibrant, diverse city of San Antonio. Students are actively engaged in local urban affairs through internships and research on local conditions while becoming citizens of the city.

It is said that the population of the state of Texas will look like the population of San Antonio in 10 years, and that the population of the United States will mirror the population of San Antonio in 20 years. What a wonderful place to study the city—in one of the largest cities in the United States with one of the most diverse populations.

Urban studies first appeared in the Trinity catalogue in 1968, a year filled with turmoil for cities but representing many "teachable moments" for universities. It has thrived through the intervening years, driven by social issues of the last decade, not the least of which were 9-11 in 2001 and Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Our curriculum is designed to expose students to the plethora of ideas about urban history, urban society, and urban development while giving them the practical tools needed to contribute to social change. Students are actively engaged in local urban affairs through internships and research conducted on local conditions while becoming citizens of the city. Our faculty are leaders in their field and help produce graduates who go on to make great changes in the places where they work and live.

Graduates with urban studies majors have become city managers, CEOs of both public and private corporations and organizations, and researchers engaged in making our cities better and more equitable places to live, conduct business, and raise a family.

The Urban Studs

The Urban Studs, a club for students interested in urban studies, have come together to explore common interests and find ways to express their enthusiasm. In late 2009, the Urban Studs didn't let final exams stop them from gathering nearly $18,000 in donations to benefit seven San Antonio social agencies. Club members encourage friends and classmates to donate unused meal plan funds to purchase canned goods and staples that help stock Food Bank shelves or fill emergency food distribution centers.